eCampus Book Selling Review: Top-Of-The-Charts Buyback Prices

Reselling your college books can be a nasty business. There’s nothing worse than waking up the morning after a most-likely failed final, hungover (Am I the only one who pregames their finals?), only to find out that the books which you paid over $1000 for at the beginning of the semester will be bought back by your campus bookstore for $62.50. Actually, I can think of several things that are worse, but they all involve Vaseline and peanut butter and probably aren’t relevant to this article.

Can anything lift someone in this situation out of such a deep pit of despair, even if the walls of this pit aren’t coated with Vaseline and/or peanut butter? Luckily, a knight in armor of varying shininess has emerged on the scene, waving a Vaseline-and-peanut-butter-free banner that reads “eCampus.com”. This hero of a website offers some incredible buyback options for students looking to sell their college books and textbooks, paying truly outstanding amounts of cash to students for their used books. Here’s some of the reasons I’m so ecstatic about it.

High buyback prices. Lately I’ve started mentioning eCampus.com’s book buyback prices instead of my roommate when I’m asked to come up with “things that are consistently high”. The money that eCampus pays for college books is the most I’ve seen thus far for a single website, and their generosity ranges from small books to whopping textbooks. Sure, the prices they offer are still most likely less than half the price of a new book, but if you’ve bought your books already used then you might even have the opportunity to make money. I’ll pause here while you pick the pieces of your blown mind up off the floor.

Easy shipping. eCampus, being the gentle giant that it is, has taken the extra step to offer free shipping to all of the students selling them books. Just print out the free shipping label they provide and you’re good to go – all that’s left is finding a box. Admittedly, finding a box can be difficult, but when finding a box is your biggest concern you’re normally doing pretty well for yourself. Unless you’re homeless, of course.

20% in-store credit bonus: Much like breast implants, I can’t really tell if this one is a pro or a con. eCampus offers the option of increasing what they pay you by twenty percent if you decide to opt for in-store credit rather than just cold cash. So, if you’re planning on buying books for next semester through eCampus, definitely go for the in-store credit option. However, if you’re thinking of looking elsewhere for your college textbooks, or if your beer funds are running a bit low (they always are), you might want to just stick with straight-up money.

Forex Robot Review – Be Wise in Using Your Forex Robot Software

Even though there is a booming number of Forex Robots in the internet that today, we can actually say that, not everything of this robot is needed. Some might people think that, though there is so much Forex Robot, each of these robots works specifically on a trader; not everything in the software is suitable for us. So, delve more time in looking for that Forex Robot that is customized only for you, because in such a way, you might be confused with the use of the Forex Robot; there is a big possibility that it might ruin your business even if they work well with other people.

This, in fact, can never be the best sit situation, that you would have a hard time searching for the robot that would specifically meet your needs. Traders now are having a long time from reading reviews, and make comparisons on the programs found on the software. This can be a good thing for you, if you would a good time now in looking for software than can somehow meet your trading techniques, and for you to be able to compare every inch of the Forex Robot with the other. Even if, there are a lot of good things that were said about a certain robot, one might actually ask if they are true. Surely, to find out is to research very well on the Forex Robot that you wanted to purchase for you not to be scammed.

Reviews about robot software act as guide. In this case, you would be aided in such a way that you can now pick that correct robot for you. In any case that you chose a Robot, these reviews are here for you to check if they can work well for you, and make you more money, rather than by just ruining your precious investment. Vendors of these Robots posts some reviews about them on their websites, for you to read them, and actually follow them for you to have a god set-up for the system.

There are certain characteristics that we can delve into for us to see which robots are the right ones for you; reviews help you out in choosing. The following that are listed below would help you from differentiating a good review from a bad one.

Firstly, some reviews would only say good thing about a Forex Robot, never the bad thing. This would just tell you that everything about the robot is good for you, which is really not. So, in a way, maker of this software just give away these reviews, for you to buy the product. It is not actually a review; it’s a selling review, for you to just read all the good stuff about the robot. You can’t seem to see any flaws in their product. In any case, good reviews always tell everything about the robot, even the bad and the positive thing about them; for you to avoid buying the scams.

And also, check the hyperlink of the main page of the review you are reading. A good review is often less in hyperlink. Some maliciously sold product s usually has so many hyperlinks on them, like on every sentence you can see hyperlinks; this can be really annoying.

And lastly, don’t read reviews with so much exclamation point. These are just claims, often leading to scams. The best Forex Robot does not depend on ranking, or saying that they are number one, but on the good reviews written about them and some comments that were said about them.

There are so many Forex Robots out there, and also reviews. The best of the best Forex Robot are from a respectable websites. In such a way that you would have a good review, there you can see the best Forex Robot.

Writing Book Reviews to Make Money

For budding writers looking to earn money on the internet, one way to break into the market is by writing book reviews and selling them to websites that need them. If you read on a regular basis, you know that what you read almost always leaves you with one impression or another – why not write about your impressions and earn money while you do so.

For some reason, most people who want to write for the internet tend to skip straight to articles and web content. Very few actually take the time to write a good book review. One of the reasons for this is that sites like Helium and Associated Content are well known article content sites that offer sure money for anyone who can write (and attract an audience to read what they write).

Nevertheless, there is something to be said for writing serious book reviews. People read them before they buy new books, and many people regard book reviews as invaluable tools for weeding out poorly written and irrelevant literature of any genre. Selling reviews is a somewhat more time consuming task than selling articles, however.

When it comes to book reviews, there are fewer options than there are for articles, though the articles that do exist can sometimes lead into steady work for a single client. Submitting your review to a magazine or newspaper, for example, can sometimes earn you an occasional guest reviewer stint, or even a full time job as a staff writer. If your skills are of a high enough quality, your writing may even earn you a job writing other content for the publication.

So, if you’re one of those people who regularly burn through the pages of a book like the front cover’s on fire and you’re racing the flames to see how the story ends, try writing and submitting your own review of a book you’ve recently read. You might surprise even yourself.

Blog For Money – You Must Have Something To Sell

Blogging has become a successful home business for many people. It’s an easy business to start, because there are few or no start up costs. However, if you want to make money, you must have something to sell on your blog – create a “sales” blog.

Although content-heavy blogs on which you sell advertising do make money, these blogs take time before they become profitable, simply because you need a lot of content. How much content? Since blogging has become mainstream, and there are many content blogs, it may take at least 500 to 1000 posts on a content blog for profitability.

“Sales” blogs, which sell products or services, can be profitable with as few as ten to 20 blog posts.

So aim for a sales blog, so your blog becomes profitable more quickly.

Before you start blogging, you need a plan. Create your plan first, before you create your blog. It’s difficult to make money with a blog which hasn’t been set up as a money-maker from the start.

Let’s look at four easy steps to developing a profitable sales blog.

1. Decide what you’ll sell on your blog

To make money, your blog must sell something: a service, or a product. Many bloggers sell affiliate products from their blog.

If you’ve been blogging for a while, you can sell your blogging services from your blog.

2. Make a list of the products, or services which you’ll sell

If you’re selling as an affiliate, make a list of products you’ll sell – reviews of these products will form the basis of your blog articles.

Many affiliate bloggers sell lots of products on a single blog. However, it will be more profitable to divide the products you’re selling into topics; then create a new blog for each topic. This means that each blog can be more focused, and this will mean more traffic.

If you’re selling your own blogging services, set up the blog to do this. Write articles promoting each service you provide. Essentially, the blog becomes your online portfolio.

3. Start blogging, but keep SALES at the forefront of your mind

Next, you can start writing blog posts. However, plan your posts. Planning is vital for a sales blog. For example, let’s say you’ve created a sales blog to sell affiliate products related to pets.

You’ve collected ten affiliate products. Plan articles related to those ten products. You can create review-style articles, as well as general content articles with a link to one of your affiliate products.

If you want to get hired as a blogger, then this must be obvious on your blog, and on every post you write – write several articles promoting each of your services.

4. Promote your blog

Finally, it’s time to promote your blog. There are many ways in which you can promote your blog: with classified advertising, Pay Per Click advertising, and article marketing.

How you choose to promote is up to you. However, do remember that you must promote your blog.

So there you have four easy steps to making money with a sales blog. When you plan your blog for sales from the start, your blog will be profitable for you from the start.

David Ogilvy’s Classic Work: How to Create Advertising That Sells Review Part 3

How to Create Advertising that Sells Review Part 3

Almost Home…

David Ogilvy’s classic How to Create Advertising That Sells Review Part 3 looks at rules eighteen through twenty-seven. It starts with the maxims about TV ads and moving to the maxims of ads in print. The advertising medium isn’t necessarily what’s important here. These maxims pay big and offer a proven history. Get the most out of each advertising dollar. Apply these maxims, regardless of the chosen medium.

Rule 18: Music

Even though, according to Ogilvy, most won’t believe this, music behind the ad in commercials decreases the consumer’s ability to remember ads. Not good, right?

Rule 19: Standups

Stand-up Pitches work if “delivered” with honesty says Ogilvy.

Rule 20: Sore Thumb

The average viewer watches more than 20,000 commercials in a year. Desperate times call for desperate measures! Ogilvy says brand it and make it one of a kind. A symbol (like imperial’s crown) or even a mnemonic device can be used.

Rule 21: Animate?

Cartoons really sell to children. Children don’t hold the power of the pocketbook however. It’s critical to know the audience. Cartoons and animation doesn’t turn over to customers when adults are the target. Grown-ups can’t “identify” with animation. This makes it less persuasive.

Rule 22: Save it!

Find out WHY an ad didn’t work. Then, repair it. Once fixed, it’s ready to go to work for real!

Rule 23: Factual vs. Emotional

In the big scheme of things, commercials which offer facts about the product or service will rank as more effective than ones using emotions. Ogilvy’s example was Maxwell House Coffee. It was very emotional and a huge success. It goes both ways, but stats say go with the facts.

Rule 24: Attention Grabbers

Commercials which open with a fast, grab the attention of viewers, and tend to hold their attention significantly better to the end than the quiet-start commercials.

What Works Best in Print…

As part of this How to Create Advertising that Sells Review Part 2, we’ll move to print advertising. We’ll look at what works and what does not.

Rule 25: 80/20

What’s 80/20? Sadly, only twenty percent of viewers will go past headlines in order to reach the content. Since eighty percent DO read the headlines, the sale takes place in the headline! There’s a conversion rate which is 5 times greater than not creating a dynamic headline. Ogilvy always used his company name and gave promise in the headline.

Rule 26: Benefits

Headlines giving a solid benefit get more sales over those that do not. Human nature makes anyone want to find out what’s in it for them! This is one of the strongest maxims in this How to Create Advertising that Sells Review Part 3 to be found.

Rule 27: News

People are curious about new products or service. They want to know which products have been changed or improved, giving reason to read on. The stats say headlines that tell sell.

Review in Summary

That completes this next part of David Ogilvy’s How to Create Advertising that Sells Review, part 3 of 4. Television and print are obviously very different advertising mediums. However, there is much to learn and apply from both arenas… Remember: Say ‘No’ to background music. Stand-ups work. Stand above the crowd. Fix whatever isn’t converting and try it again. Facts sell more than emotion. Grab the viewer’s attention right out the door. Power is in the headline… don’t mess it up! Show the consumer “what is in it for them”… give the biggest, strongest benefit inside the headline. Finally, share newsy points about what’s being sold will work extremely well.

Part four of How to Create Advertising that Sells Review will conclude more million-dollar truths by Ogilvy and show what works and what doesn’t. If viewer’s attention isn’t grabbed or demanded, the sale is lost! Part 4 promises to end with a bang, so keep looking.

Easily Get Restaurant Reviews From Customers

These days, people don’t buy anything without reading reviews first. Amazon.com is the world’s favorite shopping mall. Visitors look for an item that is both heavily reviewed and has a mostly positive rating. There is suspicion of items that have no reviews, as that means to most folks that the business is probably new and the item they’re looking at is of questionable quality. Positive customer reviews weigh in big time within the consumer psyche and the convenience at which reviews can be posted means that every interaction with a customer is a potential opportunity to make or break many future sales. These ideas began with the retail industry, and they’ve spread like wildfire to restaurants.

So, should you ask for reviews or not? Let’s review the pros and cons:

PROS

Incentivizing is a great motivator for everything in the world. If you want reviews from your customers, offer them something of value. Asking for reviews isn’t bad as long as you’re not flat-out paying for them. Put something fun together: drop review submitters’ names into a monthly raffle for a free lunch, pick a top reviewer and send them to an exotic themed vacation (think Olive Garden sending families to Italy), have your top chef prepare dinner for a certain special patron. There are tons of ideas that involve a thematic approach to incentivized rewards versus just handing out cash. Get your patrons involved and excited and reap the benefits of a truly passionate reviewer!

If you choose to nudge patrons in the right direction, make it easy for them. Offering them a comment card is one way to go, and you can put that review up on your website, but how can you get the word out on UrbanSpoon or Yelp, two of the most popular restaurant review sites? You’ve got to tell customers where to submit their feedback. “Search for us on UrbanSpoon!” is a quick, easy and non-pushy way to let people know you’re active on that site. Make sure to develop a way to track your review-submitting patrons so that you can reward them. You’ll generally receive an email notification when a review is submitted to either one of those sites.

Posting restaurant reviews can be fun! Think about the power of mobile Smartphone applications: a patron can take a picture of your menu (or their meal plate) on their phone and post it online instantly, even while they’re still eating their Southwest Quesadilla Special. They can then immediately “thumbs up” or “thumbs down” your business based on their experience. This is incredibly helpful to other customers. PRO TIP: Consider taking clear pictures of your menu and your location and uploading them to review sites before someone else does. Doing so helps potential new customers decide if they want to eat at your establishment by taking the guesswork out of what you’ve got to offer. The more information that’s readily available about your business, the better.

CONS

The first question you need to ask yourself honestly is this: “Is my restaurant ready to be reviewed?” Many restaurant owners get antsy and jump the gun, so to speak, in taking steps to force reviews. They may have had a slow grand opening and think that getting “good press” on sites like UrbanSpoon and Yelp is the only way to stay operative. These sites are dynamite for influencing potential customers, but hard selling reviews is not the way to go. If your restaurant isn’t 100% where you want it to be at, incentivizing reviews could also mean reminding people that they can post negative reviews, too. As many small business owners have learned, one negative review that’s boosted to the front page of Google can spell doom for their business. Just like a positive review can encourage new folks to try an unfamiliar restaurant, a negative review can drive just as many away. Lesson: don’t force reviews if you’re not ready for them.

Positive reviews from non-incentivized customers will almost always feel more “real.” So although it may take longer to get a review, it may be worth your wait.

Have you ever read a restaurant review and just known that it was the owner writing it, or one of the company’s employees? How did that make you feel? Most consumers who feel like they’ve experienced a fake review will immediately go elsewhere, with a permanent sense of distrust in that business.

Some review databases (like Yelp) frown on incentivized/paid reviews. They’ll go as far to delete over-zealous, fake sounding reviews in order to keep their site “honest.” In this case, it may not be worth the investment to reward a reviewer.

If your restaurant is outstanding on both service and menu fronts, you may not have to encourage review submittal at all. A new patron should be so floored after having left your establishment that they want to share their experience with the world. Have you ever been to a restaurant where the server was “on it,” the food was excellent, the wait was nonexistent, and the atmosphere was just fun? I bet you wanted to tell people about it. This same theory applies to restaurant reviews: provide an entirely excellent experience at every point of contact and expect to be rewarded for your hard work.

The answer is up to you. If you can solicit reviews in a fun, creative way, that plan might work out well for your business. Beware of over-incentivizing; remember you want honest reviews, not a bunch of fluff. No doubt, reviews are a superb way to generate new business. You might even say they’ve become essential in today’s world of infinite information. Keep in mind that consistently great service will be rewarded with words of praise, so keep your bar set high, your plates clean, drinks full, food hot, and staff friendly. You’ll eventually get to the point where you don’t need to solicit reviews anymore, they’ll just come naturally.

Top 5 Best Selling Albums in Britain in 2010

2010 was a great year for music in Britain with some amazing album releases. Album reviews were flying off the shelves for breakthrough brands, but it was the old guard that ruled the roost at the top of the album charts. The top 5 best selling albums in Britain is filled with established acts and while there aren’t any that I can pick out as favourites of mine, you can’t always ignore the numbers. When there is that many people buying an album there’s got to be something about it that has grabbed the attention of the masses.

5. Plan B, The Defamation of Strickland Banks

The only breakthrough album release of 2010 fell to London wide boy, Plan B, or Benjamin Balance-Drew as he’s know to his mum. The release of The Defamation of Strickland Banks, his second studio album, in April 2010, led to an instant number 1 in the UK album charts. It sold over sixty eight thousand copies in its first week and went on to sell a whopping eight hundred and twenty six thousand copies throughout the course of the year. Album reviews were fairly positive overall with ratings ranging from six out of ten to four out of five, but his move away from his rapping routes prompted one album review from the Telegraph to describe it as being “populist” although the overall tone of the review was generally favourable

4. Rihanna, Loud

The ups and downs of Rihanna’s personal life has been well documented by the media, but when it comes to her albums it always seems to be on the up and up. It including high grossing hits Only Girl in the World, What’s my Name and S&M. Released in November 2010 the album the album went in at number 2, selling in the region of 91,000 copies, but later climbed to the number 1 spot. Though it was released late in the year, it still managed to sell 839,000 copies in total. Rihanna’s Loud received average to favourable album reviews from the mainstream press.

3. Lady GaGa, The Fame / The Fame Monster

When Lady GaGa first appeared on the music scene it was as though she appeared out of nowhere and was suddenly everywhere. Now it feels like she’s always been there. The illusion of her meteoric rise to musical prominence has been fuelled by the trash media and paparazzi that she seems to target so much in her music. The love hate relationship continues in The Fame / The Fame Monster and while it was originally released in November 2009 as an EP as a re-release of The Fame, it still went on to be the third best selling album of 2010 in the Britain.

2. Michael Buble, Crazy Love

Who’d of thought it. Michael Buble had the second highest grossing album of 2010, epitomising the fact that you can never underestimate the buying power of easy listening loving ladies everywhere. The smooth singing Canadian has turned into a power house of selling album selling prowess and in 2010 he really hit the mark with Crazy Love. Michael Buble’s fourth studio album, Crazy Love is another crooner loving record and went straight in at number 1 in October 2009, but maintained sales all the way through 2010 to guarantee it a place in the top 5 best selling albums in Britain in 2010. Selling more than 1, 227,000 copies, but to be fair, it doesn’t really matter how many albums he sells, he’s never going to get into the Rat Pack.

1. Take That, Progress

Back during the 90s Take That were the bees knees with the girls at my school. They wore Take That emblems around there necks and probably cried like crazy people at the news that they were breaking up. It is these same girls, now women, that have secured Take That’s resurgence to musical hegemony of a certain persuasion, making their album, Progress, the biggest selling album of 2010 in Britain. Released on 15th November 2010 and returning Robbie Williams to the Take That fold after his long dark days alone in the California sun, it inevitable charted straight in at number 1. Despite the release being so late in the day in 2010, it still managed to sell in excess of 1.8 million records. Album reviews were very positive, giving it an average of around 8 out of 10 in both popular and industry media, but more than anything, it gave Robbie something more than just aliens to believe in.

How to Create Advertising That Sells: Review of the Legendary Advertising Showpiece

How to Create Advertising that Sells Review

David Ogilvy is known across the world as “The Father of Advertising.” This How to Create Advertising That Sells Review looks at one of the strongest, if not THE strongest, works on the rules of advertising. It’s based solely on market research and will deliver on the promise.

Ogilvy was an advertising exec sensation who was sought after within his industry. He compiled more than 40 years of advertising research into one amazing piece. It only contains 1900 words. It ran during the 1960’s and 1970’s in newspapers for his company. Ogilvy wrote Confessions of an Advertising Man, quite probably the most prominent and celebrated books authored on Advertising. He started his lengthy vocation employed by Gallup. Knowing what Gallup does, that’s likely to be most perfect point for an advertising man to start a stunning profession.

So We Begin… Part One

In this Ogilvy quintessential masterpiece “How to Create Advertising that Sells” Review, we’ll cover the initial 7 maxims. Now, covering seven rules out of 38 can appear to be insignificant at first glance. However, one would at their wit’s end to stuff this quantity of information concerning the ad biz into a more condensed study.

Maxim One: Position

Ogilvy considers Dove soap as the ideal illustration. They have a few choices for the campaign. Would selling clean hands be their best option? OR, would selling soft skin be a better option? The decision ad execs made that day was the first-rate answer for Unilever as proprietor of the Dove brand. When getting ready to sell a product or service, begin here.

Maxim Two: The Promise

With making a very large promise, Ogilvy said the ad can’t be wrong. Make the “obligation” exclusive. Make it a real contender. Lastly, the product or service had MUST ACCOMPLISH the promise given. If it can’t, start over.

Maxim Three: Image

When considering branding a person or business, create the “most sharply defined personality” for the brand. When every ad campaign goes in several different directions and lacks a concise focus, that business is likely to fail. A big picture is what is missing. Advertising should be based on a campaign, not a single ad. Lacking a consistent theme from one ad to the next is a kiss of death. With social media, coming across as a slightly bi-polar is easily possible. Successful social media campaign ideas have to pull together this idea as a foundation. Make the brand image consistent every place, every time.

Maxim Four: ONE LARGE Idea

Ogilvy said it’s normally a very basic concept. It just takes one idea, though. It required because it “gives the customer a jolt” and makes them pay attention to the ad. It’s no secret that a business must stand apart from the competition in order to get noticed. Agreed? But, in order for a customer to take action, it’s a completely different thing. Developing over-the-top, complicated ideas are amazingly easier than coming up with ONE Straightforward, uncomplicated LARGE idea, according to Ogilvy. It requires pure genius. They will withstand the test of time.

Maxim Five: Superior

Its common sense, but it’s often overlooked. Consumers consider an unattractive product with an “inferior image.” The world in which we live is extremely visual. The way things appear always alters perception, without exception. It’s always been this way. Garbage in… Garbage out.

Maxim Six: Don’t Be Boring

Be very charming. Attempt to engage the viewer and get him or her involved. “Make him hungry.” Next, get him to participate. It isn’t difficult to be interesting, but pushing for involvement is slightly harder.

Maxim Seven: Innovate

Be the starter of trends. Don’t blindly follow crazes and trends. Ogilvy discovered that ad campaigns that followed trends were RARELY successful. He recommended engaging in some market testing with real consumers. It IS a bit precarious to head off into an uncharted direction. Market testing allows ad developers to exercise caution and gain a level of security.

Maxim Eight: Glory Hogs

I bet this was extremely controversial for the time. In fact, it’s probably still controversial because of society. It’s expected that we give a list of our accomplishments and qualifications. Any awards are expected in this list. Ogilvy felt creative awards for ads deludes creativity in people and steers them away from goals. What is the goal? In successful campaigns, the goal is the quest of sales. Ponder upon on what persuades the consumer and not what gains awards.

Review in Summary

So, this was the first quarter of David Ogilvy’s How to Create Advertising that Sells Review. Pretty amazing? Considering how old it is, it is still so relevant and very timely. The value of this document is priceless. Hundreds of thousands had to be spent on worthless, unsuccessful ads in order to gather data and determine what creates success. So, figure out what will be sold and remember to sell the sizzle. Make a large promise, and then deliver. Create a laser-focused brand and place it at the front of each ad. Create ONE LARGE idea. Continue the thread through every campaign. Favorable visuals correspond with more successful campaigns. Boring is bad. Take out some insurance and start a trend. Think profit not recognition.

Part two of How to Create Advertising that Sells Review promises more value along with breathtaking, profit-generating maxims by the advertising legend.

Do Your Store Displays Sell?

Your store displays are key to attracting customers and selling your products. When you are creating displays, you should have a clear plan and purpose for each display.

Effective retail displays should:

 

  • communicate a wide variety of information to consumers
  • play an integral part of a coordinated sales strategy
  • tell a visual story
  • speak for you even when you are busy with other customers

 

Displays are an invitation to a customer to look a little closer at what you have to offer. It is a non-threatening way of enticing your customer to explore your product. With current technology, displays can be very powerful multimedia experiences, or with a little thought and design, simple, inexpensive presentations of merchandise can be dramatic statements.

By putting more thought and planning into your merchandising and display, you can have an impact on your bottom line. It might be a difference of one sale each day. Even if that sale is only $5.00, you have increased your monthly sales by $150.00. Imagine if each of your store displays could do that!

Consider all the potential display areas in your store. Take into account the store windows, the ends of aisles, the back wall, columns or pillars, point-of-sale displays, front tables, etc. These are all opportunities that can be maximized to become effective sales areas.

To present your merchandise in the most effective manner possible, your displays and merchandising need to do the following:

1. Attract Attention

When you are placing merchandise, you are not simply making it available to customers. There are many products out there competing for your customers’ dollar. How will you stand out from the rest? You may have the exact product they are looking for, but it may never be seen. How can that be, when it is right there in front of them?

Have you ever misplaced something, and looked high and low for it, and finally found it – sitting right in front of you all along? It is similar with consumers. People are bombarded daily with media messages all selling something. Stores are full of merchandise competing for attention. This becomes information overload, so the brain sorts out which information is relevant and which is not. People notice their favorite stores and develop particular patterns of shopping based on preferences and needs. These preferences become ingrained habits.

Strong displays help break through these habits and routines to attract attention. Suddenly, the brain is saying – “Wait a minute! This is new! It doesn’t fit in to my sorting system. It looks exciting and might be relevant to my needs.”

This is the goal of your display, to attract the customer’s eye and get him or her to stop for a moment for a closer look.

2. Communicate a message

The most obvious message you need to communicate is that you have products available for sale. If this was the only job you had to do, you could leave the products in boxes or on tables and let the customers fend for themselves. However, most consumers don’t want to work this hard. You need to at least let them know what type of merchandise you have available and what it will cost them. It is also helpful to say what this merchandise will do for them, whether it is a new product, if it will suit their needs and taste, how it works, etc.

Some messages you can communicate through displays:

  • Product selection
  • Product information
  • Product demonstration
  • Price
  • Lifestyle
  • Season
  • New merchandise

3. Use displays to encourage action 

 

  • Get the shopper to stop or enter store
  • Encourage shoppers to move through the store and browse
  • Encourage them to try out or touch the merchandise
  • Create desire for impulse purchases
  • Suggest complimentary merchandise
  • Create a sense of urgency (Why should the shopper buy now?)

4. Use displays to leave a lasting impression. 

 

  • Encourage the customer to return
  • Update displays regularly
  • Customers expect to see change, newness, excitement

 

Displays are key components of your sales toolbox. They will be most effective when planned to complement other selling strategies such as advertising, store identity and design, and customer service/personal selling.

Review your product displays. They should be boosting sales or they are not doing their job.

How to Publish Your Book: Getting Those All-Important Reviews and Testimonials

Great reviews and testimonials help sell your book; therefore any actions you take to promote your book should include such reviews and testimonials. They can be gold. They help persuade book lovers that your book deserves a place on their shelves. They also help convince bookstore chains, individual bookstores, and libraries to stock your book.

Where do you start? The answer is as early as possible. Most reviewers want an actual copy of the book. An e-book won’t work, although that perception is changing. If reviewers can get an advance copy prior to publication, so much the better. Some reviewers will accept galleys but they expect to receive copies of the finished book later. For example, the School Library Journal will accept galleys. These must be received at least two months prior to the publication date. This gives the Journal time to review your book and print the review in their newsletter, either close to or shortly after publication date. You should be aware, however, that some reviewers do not accept self-published books.

There are several ways to let potential reviewers know about your upcoming book. The obvious one is a press release. As well, social media is playing an increasingly large role. If you have a blog, you can discuss your work and its availability. Better still, you can contact those bloggers with an interest in your book’s topic. They may be willing to write a review and post it on their blog. You could also have a fan page on Facebook. You would encourage your followers to write their own reviews to post on your fan page, and on their own pages.

You are also going to request reviews from newspapers and magazines, especially magazines that have a particular interest in your topic area. The odds of your getting a review in a national newspaper or magazine are pretty small. Getting a review from a local newspaper or magazine, as I’ve done, is more likely. Find out the name of the person to whom your request should go. If you have friends with contacts in the media, especially radio, TV and newspapers, ask them to help you.

Testimonials come from people who have read your book and found it to be of value. It could be a business book with advice on accounting, something technical, such as how to use digital cameras, or simply a piece of fiction that gave special insight to an issue or situation. Sometimes a delighted reader will send you a spontaneous response. More likely you’ll have to contact those with your book and ask for a testimonial. That happened with one of my business books. I first called them, then followed up with e-mail. Out of about 20 requests, five actually responded. This brings me to my final point.

People, though usually well meaning, can be notoriously slow in delivering a review or testimonial, even when they have agreed to do so. You have to be persistent. It may take several calls, multiple e-mails before you get a result. Or you may not hear at all. The problem is that the testimonial is never urgent to those you approach, only to you. And don’t offer an incentive to complete that testimonial. It can bring up issues of integrity. So be persistent. If one source won’t cooperate, keep going to others until you get what you need. Great reviews and testimonials add credibility to your sales efforts. You need them. They help sell books.